How to find a breeder for your labradoodle puppy

When you start the search for your new puppy, you want to get a dog that will be the right temperament for you and your family, but you also want to get a dog that is healthy and was brought into this world through responsible breeding. Highlands Australian Cobberdogs explains the traits that you should look for when you start to search for a breeder.

  1. How long have you been breeding this type of dog? While experience does not always guarantee a happy healthy puppy, it can certainly help. With breeds like the Australian Cobberdog that have only been an officially recognized breed since 2012, there is not going to be as must history as there will be with other older breeds.
  2. Where do the dogs live? Even if the breeder is a professional breeder that devotes all of their time to breeding dogs, the dogs should live inside. If you are looking to adopt a family dog, then you will want a dog that is treated like a family dog from the beginning. That means in the house, not outside, not in a heated shed and not locked in the basement.
  3. Can I meet the parents? This should be a no brainer for any breeder to say yes to. A breeder is (or should be) someone that has fallen in love with the breed and wants to do their part in being an ambassador for that breed to the public. They should want to show off their beautiful healthy dogs to you, so they can demonstrate how great their puppies will be. If you decide to come to their home and meet the doggy parents is completely up to you, but a breeder will likely be better able to match you with the right puppy if they can get to know you a little better.
  4. Do you have references? A good breeder is going to be happy to give you names of people that are raising puppies and are happy with them.
  5. May I see the health clearance? Pure bred dogs are especially prone to genetic conditions that can affect the health and the lifetime of the dog. A health clearance is an evaluation that is done by an independent organization that test for hereditary problems. Each breed is going to be different in what conditions they are prone to – labradoodle puppies for instance are prone to having hip dysplasia and joint problems.
  6. Do the dogs participate in shows? A breeder wants to promote the breed of dog that they love and the best way to do that is to gain credibility in dog shows.
  7. How many liters do you have a year? Realistically a breeder will only have time to properly care for socialize one or two litters a year.
  8. Do you have a spay/neuter contract? Responsible breeders want to keep others from being irresponsible breeders, so they typically have a spay or neuter contract with new owners. This also helps prevent them from adding to the pet overpopulation problem.